Things are Happening for Ossining

img_2040Every year at noon on New Year’s Day, the Ossining community comes together for an inauguration. The time and date is actually dictated by the Village Charter. The fact that we make what could be the recitation of a few words into a community event, is one the things that makes Ossining special.

In my remarks, I announced a new mayoral weekly commitment, and set out a vision for the exciting changes we are poised to make happen for Ossining. Two of the hottest topics of public engagement last year, housing and the roundabout, are part of the economic development planning that will be the focus for 2017. The Village is at an exciting moment, poised to make changes for our downtown that will impact our community for generations to come.

Happy New Year!

This year I asked my parents to join me on stage for the Oath of Office. My parents are the greatest role models in my life, not just because they are wonderful loving parents, but because of their dedication to public service. Regardless of whether they were raising young children, or commuting to NYC for work each day, they have always devoted their time and talents to community organizations. And not just things directly related to our family like school or church. They did that of course. But they also volunteer with organizations that speak to their values—like programs for children, seniors, local history, healthcare, education, and women’s rights. My mother was asked to run for local office a number of times, but always declined. My father retired at a young age, and for the past 18 years has made a full-time job of volunteering for community organizations. If it were not for their inspiring examples, I know I would never have run for mayor.img_2038

 

I am fortunate to share the stage with a number of elected officials who are also role models and mentors for me today. One study I recently learned of demonstrated that the healthiest, happiest, and safest lives are lived by Americans in Villages where their lives are intertwined. That’s good news for Ossining residents, and particularly for all the engaged community members in this room today.

 

As many Americans feel ever more impotent at influencing the path of our nation, we recognize there is a place where we can make a difference. We are turning toward each other, and seeking to devote our talents to making the most of the opportunities we have right here, right now in Ossining. It is an exciting moment to participate actively in shaping the change we wish to see for our Village.

  • This Village can turn a sanitary sewer project into a glorious greenway.
  • We have seen empty storefronts become thriving local gathering spaces.
  • The decrease in our energy demand by upgrading to LED streetlights offers enough savings to keep our tax rate increase this year at 0%.
  • We have passed laws to expand opportunities for entrepreneurs to open their businesses of tomorrow right here in Ossining.
  • We have invited hundreds of people to live in luxury on our waterfront, and thousands to enjoy sunsets from the new Henry Gourdine Park on the Hudson.

Ossining is poised to see major change happen in our downtown. We have a thoughtful and collaborative Board of Trustees, with a willingness to make big decisions about the Village’s future. Critical leaders of our staff are capable implementing big projects for Ossining. And we have the solid fiscal standing to invest in infrastructure that will benefit our community for generations to come.

 

Weekly Walks

As we enter this exciting year with a focus on bringing into view big changes for development in our downtown, I am going to add a new commitment to my weekly mayoral schedule. And I’m announcing it to you right now.

 

When I took office as Mayor two years ago, I established Open Office Hours every Tuesday from 10AM to 12 noon. That routine has been a very successful way to meet with residents who have concerns, questions, suggestions, or once in a while a friendly chat. I will continue to be at Village Hall every Tuesday for Open Office Hours. Emailing me any time is also an effective way to get my attention.

 

For my second term, as we shift into a focus on planning, zoning, housing, and development of land that is currently owned by the Village, I will be taking a weekly walk. I’ll keep up the routine until I’ve walked every block of the Village. I’ll post my starting place and time on FB and the Village website so that you can join me if you’d like.

 

A Thriving Downtown

In 2016 we engaged in a public discussion about safe, affordable housing that inspired hundreds of tenants, property owners, housing advocates, attorneys, taxpayers, and elected officials to deepen our understanding of the realities and needs of our community. In 2017, the Village will undertake a Housing Needs Assessment that will provide us with not just an accurate inventory of our existing housing stock and conditions, but one of the tools that will help us make well-informed modifications to our Comprehensive Plan, which drives all local zoning regulations. The discussion about safe and affordable housing will continue, and will be part of a larger discussion about economic development.

 

Ossining today is, in part, a result of decisions made by past Village administrations. Elected officials in the 1970s bought into the prevailing wisdom of their day, and decided that Urban Renewal was a wise idea for our downtown. The results of Urban Renewal, which demolished two of the five corners at the heart of our downtown, have been mixed, at best. The people living in those buildings lost their homes, and our downtown lost beautiful architecture as well as a whole side of the street which completes the balance needed for a truly thriving downtown.

 

But as with any major change, there comes opportunity. I am grateful to be Mayor in a moment when we are poised to capitalize on the space that was left by Urban Renewal. Rather than perceiving it as a scar on our downtown business district, I recognize it as an incredible gift for the Village. Where there were once buildings filling each block, we have an opportunity to create a welcoming public gathering space in the heart of the Village. Today these spaces provide parking and host our weekly farmer’s market and a number of festivals and events throughout the year. But the potential for these open spaces to inspire people to spend time in our downtown is no where close to being fully realized. At this stage, let’s not limit our vision to any particular size and scope of what structures may be built in these spaces, or how parking will be expanded.

 

Our goal as we actively shape the future we wish to experience for Ossining, must be to create a public gathering place where a mother wants to sit and read a book to her child; a place where high school students gather in the afternoon to share a smoothies with their friends; a place where seniors from Maple House rest on their way home from a little shopping up the block; a place where families enjoy ice cream on a hot summer night; a place where co-workers sip coffee during a break from their second story Main St business that thrives in tomorrow’s economy, and it’s a business that we could not even conceive of when we drafted our most recent Comprehensive Plan. And yes, sometimes it will be a place that hosts cultural festivals and holiday tree lightings. But to be a success, this public gathering place must be an essential component of a whole downtown that is buzzing with activity on any given Tuesday—with no festival required to make people want to show up.

 

In recent years, we’ve laid the groundwork for what’s next. A few years ago, the Village commissioned a study by consultants to inform the Board and the community of what a developer would seek to build on the Market Square properties to maximize their profitability. It was almost two years ago, that several community members joined me in workshops and online venues to gather feedback from the community of what we’d like to see happen for these properties. And right now the Sing Sing Prison Museum is closer than ever to becoming a reality. It is exciting to explore how that major institution could impact our local landscape and economy.

 

I would be remiss if I did not mention the topic of public discussion that elicited an intensity of passion among community members this year, second perhaps only to housing—the roundabout. Construction of the new intersection is planned for the summer of 2017. Ossining will become the only Hudson River community to have a modern roundabout at the heart of its downtown. Because of the dramatically improved safety that roundabouts provide, they are the go-to recommendation by the NYS DOT, and many other states, for any new and upgraded intersection construction. Because even small single-lane roundabouts like the one we will have, require a larger footprint than an electrified signal, roundabouts are often not an option in densely built downtowns. It is only because of the negative space left by Urban Renewal that the roundabout was an option for us to consider in our decision making for this necessary infrastructure upgrade.

 

So, our job today as a community, is to actively participate in shaping the change we wish to see for our downtown. Some entrepreneurs are already investing their talents, their treasure, and their dreams into our local economy. First Village Coffee is one of the recent new businesses to open and find a very enthusiastic and loyal customer base on Main St. Just before they opened, I was speaking with an engaged community member, someone has spent a fair amount of time thinking about our local economy. He said to me, “I’m really worried that the coffee shop is not going to have enough customers to survive.” This well-intentioned resident grossly underestimated our community’s appetite for a welcoming, high quality, gathering space in our downtown. Let us all embrace more of that faith in the spirit of our community that leads local entrepreneurs to open businesses in Ossining.

 

I began today by acknowledging some of the role models who inspire me to be serve my community. I’d like to close with a few thank yous for the some of the people who make it possible for me to serve as Mayor. Thank you to the chairwoman of the Democratic Committee Thomasina Laidley-Brown who supports our journey in public office, and leads the process of gathering hundreds of signatures each year to get our names on the ballot. Thank you to the community members who lead great organizations that provide the services that keep us safe and allow our socioeconomically diverse community to not just survive, but to thrive. Thank you to my fellow elected officials for all that you give to your constituents, including me, and all that you contribute to well-being of the Village of Ossining. Thank you to members of the Village staff, those here today and those who come to work every day to serve the people of Ossining so admirably. Thank you to the parents and coaches who drive my kids home from practice when I’m at a meeting. And most importantly, thank you to my family. My sons have an uncanny ability to roll with whatever the schedule is on any given day, they cheer me on as mayor, they are always happy to eat pizza for dinner again, and they don’t grumble as they again go to bed without being tucked in by mom. And to my husband, thank you for carrying the financial burden of our family, even as you work tirelessly to open your new business. Thank you for being my most patient and sage advisor.

 

Every two years, elected officials in the Village come to the voters and ask to serve another term. I imagine if you asked each of us on this stage, we’d each have a unique story of what made us seek office. But I also imagine there would be a universal theme of our desire to serve this community that we love. It’s that same love of Ossining that brought each of you here to this gym at the Community Center, to share part of New Year’s Day with your neighbors.

 

We are living in interesting times. All of us have a role to play in the success of Ossining. Sometimes that may be to vigorously debate issues that matter deeply to us; sometimes that may be to show up and listen; sometimes it may be to eat jerk chicken, or drink coffee, or buy a pretty new dress, whatever small investment we choose to make in supporting a local business that day.

 

And sometimes it may be to lead us in a song. I’d like to invite up to the microphone three very special Ossining residents. Anna Canoni is the granddaughter of Woody Guthrie. She and her daughters Kaylee and Alexis are going to lead us in singing This Land is Your Land. I hope everyone will join in.

Tuesday Elections!!

Want lawn signs at your home? Email me your address and I'll come by!
Want lawn signs at your home? Email me your address and I’ll come by!

What is more patriotic than voting? What better to celebrate the foundation of our democracy than to vote for our neighbors who represent us in our local government?

There are two particular candidates for local office that I’d like to draw your attention to…

Trustee Rika Levin is looking to keep her seat on the Village board. Click to read why we appointed her to the BOT last month. Here’s a 10-word summary:

intelligence, marketing skills, MBA, corporate & nonprofit experience, brings so much!

Please also join me in voting for Dana Levenberg to be our next Ossining Town Supervisor. Dana is already contributing to Ossining’s future economic success and energy resiliency. As the Chief of Staff for Assemblywoman Sandy Galef, Dana was a driving force in getting local entities to seek a $100k NY Prize grant for a feasibility study to explore how Ossining can be at the forefront of energy independence and storm resiliency. We won that grant and are already learning more about our local resources and their potential.

Dana also recently led the coordination of municipal, private and nonprofit groups in a coalition of Ossining parties who are seeking funding to fuel our local economic development–in this case as part of the Upstate Revitalization Initiative just introduced by the NYS Regional Economic Development Council. Dana’s work ethic and depth of knowledge of how to navigate opportunities from NYS are a huge asset to Ossining.

I know she will bring that same collaborative spirit and dedication for making big things happen to her work as Ossining Town Supervisor. I am excited to partner with Dana and her colleagues on the Town Board to expand opportunities to better serve the people of Ossining.

I will be voting for the whole Democratic line of candidates this year. But you can also find Rika, Dana and other outstanding local candidates, including County Legislator Catherine Borgia, on the Independence Party line and often also on the Working Families Party line.

Parents, Tuesday is not just Teacher Conference Day–it’s Teach Your Kids Democracy Day…bring them with you to the polls!

Whatever line you vote on, please be sure to vote on Election Day Tuesday! Bring your kids to the polls! Bring your neighbor! Host a lawn sign to let your neighbors know: Election Day is here, and your vote matters!

 

Leadership Changes

I ran for Mayor on a platform of change—and that has certainly been the case this year when it comes to key leadership positions in village government. In May we welcomed Village Manager Abraham Zambrano. One of the strengths Manager Zambrano brings is his experience in finance—and with budget season upon us, we are making the most of his keen eye for recognizing opportunities to spend tax dollars more efficiently. Selecting Lieutenant Kevin Sylvester to succeed Chief Joseph Burton as leader of the Ossining Police Department, heralds a new generation of leadership, with an appreciation for tradition. And most recently, we’ve have some unexpected changes on the Board of Trustees.

Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 5.17.04 AM On September 16, Trustee Rika Levin was sworn into office. She was appointed to the vacancy left by former Trustee Omar Herrera. Trustee Levin’s experience managing budgets in the business and nonprofit worlds will be a particularly valuable skill as we enter budget season. Her appointment is through the end of 2015. Rika Levin’s name will appear on the ballot in November as she seeks to hold her seat for 2016.

Trustee Robert Daraio announced he would be resigning from the Board effective September 30. Complicating the process of filling this sudden vacancy, was a long-planned vacation that Trustee John Codman had just begun the previous day. Now that Trustee Codman has returned, the Board will meet in executive session to discuss how we want to address this newest opening.

These recent changes may make the November ballot seem a bit confusing for Ossining Village voters. So here’s a guide to help you prepare for the November 3 election with regards to the 2016 Board of Trustees:

  • There are 2 seats up for election for a 2-year term, expiring 12/31/17. There are two candidates for these seats: Manuel Quezada & Quantel Bazemore. They are running unopposed. These candidates will appear on the Democratic, Independence and Working Families Party lines. The Republican and Conservative Parties did not endorse any candidates for these seats.
  • There is 1 seat up for election for a 1-year term, expiring 12/31/16. This is the seat that Trustee Rika Levin holds now. She was appointed by the Board of Trustees to fill the position through the end of 2015. On November 3, voters will go to the polls to choose between Rika Levin who will appear on the Democratic and Independence Party lines; or Luke Carbonaro who will appear on the Republican and Conservative Party lines.

The Village Charter instructs the Board to “appoint a qualified person to fill such vacancy; if an elective office, until the next Charter Election, when the vacancy shall be filled at said election for the unexpired term of such office.” Village government has seen a lot of appointments in recent history, including these familiar names: John Codman, Sue Donnelly, Bill Hanauer, Miguel Hernandez…

The Village Charter leaves the process for how to select the appointment up to the discretion of the Board. Each appointment is unique; one significant factor to consider is the amount of time remaining in the unexpired term. The process that led to the appointment of Trustee Rika Levin began with a public solicitation for resumes, followed by Board of Trustee interviews of the nine applicants. We chose Rika Levin knowing that, at the very least, she would be with us through the end of this year. Her experience managing budgets in the corporate and nonprofit world will be of great value during the budget season. It is our hope that voters support her continuing in this position. Her experience in marketing and branding strategy will be an excellent resource for this Board’s goal of improving communication and public outreach.

With less than three months remaining in the unexpired term created by now former Trustee Robert Daraio’s seat, the decision-making will reflect that different circumstance. We could appoint Quantel Bazemore. He is running unopposed to be in that seat on January 1, so an appointment now would essentially give him a head-start on the term. We could leave the seat vacant through the end of the year. We could appoint one of the candidates we interviewed last month when we selected Trustee Levin. We could appoint a community member who has contributed to Ossining over the years and may offer a helpful perspective as we enter this year’s budget season.

This week the Board of Trustees will meet in executive session to discuss how we will proceed with this appointment. Each individual who serves as Trustee changes the dynamic of the group. Whatever decision we make about whether and how to fill the vacancy for the final months of this year, it will be interesting to experience it with this newly established Board. One unifying characteristic among all the trustees I have served with, is our desire to look out for the interests of the people we represent. It is an honor and a responsibility we do not take lightly.

Standing Strong

I posted the below message on Facebook yesterday.  The outpouring of support has been remarkable.  Encouraging statements have come from family, friends, supporters, and folks who are simply fed-up with village politics.  This week is certainly not a high point for transparency in local government.  The residents of Ossining deserve better.  I am grateful to be connecting with so many community members, and look forward to building a more open, responsive and engaging relationship between village officials and the public.

Last night it was alleged that ethics charges have been filed against me.  This action serves only to reinforce my dedication to becoming a mayor who reaches out to the community, encouraging transparency and public engagement.

I have not yet seen the “ethics charges” referenced during last night’s publicly televised Board of Trustees meeting.  However, other village employees have.  Trustee Bob Daraio stated that “ethics charges” impacted his vote to support granting preferred developer status for 200 Main Street to Interoceanic Corporation.

No effort was made to obtain my response to this allegation, or even inform me of the charge before publicly revealing it as a pretext to discredit both my husband’s business, Sing Sing Kill Brewery, and myself.  The village struggled to locate the said email and could not even provide me with a copy of it.

Does it seem fair and transparent that a trustee referenced “ethics charges” when casting a vote, while I am the accused and I have not even seen them?  Did all the voting members of the board have access to that same information when they cast their votes?  The vote itself was tainted, and such an important decision on a key property should have been tabled pending resolution of the issue—particularly given that the source of the alleged complaint is Daniel V. Remer, a supporter of my opponent.

This bullying tactic is consistent with the current administration’s practice of stifling public comments.

So proud to have co-founded this group dedicated to engaging the community on issues that matter.  Last night our topic was gun violence.  Our committee is pictured here with our outstanding panelists.
So proud to have co-founded this group dedicated to engaging the community on issues that matter. Last night our topic was gun violence. Our committee is pictured here with our outstanding panelists.  www.OssiningDocumentaries.org

My public statements regarding 200 Main Street were made with complete disclosure that I am a Village Trustee and a Candidate for Mayor, and that I have recused myself from all deliberations and decision-making regarding the village-owned property because my husband is an interested party.  The article I wrote in the Patch provided information and encouraged public engagement about a flagship property whose future will dramatically impact the vibrancy of our downtown economy.  I was heartened by the thoughtful and respectful public response that resulted.

Being an elected official does not mean I give up my first amendment right to free speech as a resident of this great nation.  Is expressing an opinion, while being completely open about my position in the village and in relation to the subject of discussion, unethical?

I have done nothing wrong.  I am troubled by the timing of these allegations.

I am grateful for the outpouring of support I have already received from friends and community members who recognize this tactic for what it is—bullying designed to discredit a candidate who seeks transparency and public engagement.

Governing with Courage

In discussions around the village, I’m finding that some community members misunderstand my position on preserving Ossining’s charter village status.

I have never advocated for dissolving the village, and I do not believe it would be good for Ossining.  Beyond the importance of honoring our rich history, there are powers and autonomy inherent in being a charter village that we would be foolish to give up.  I do, however, believe leaders should explore more opportunities for shared services to reduce redundancy and save tax dollars.

Carolyn Mackie Oss PicAs Albany pushes us to work harder at finding further opportunities for consolidation, village officials must hold the interest of the people of Ossining as our highest priority in all decision making.  Ossining already has over a dozen fiscally wise inter-municipal agreements that do not undermine our autonomy.

It is time for change in Ossining—time to shake up the status quo.

This mayoral race is about electing the person who will best serve our community.  I’ll always strive to work with political courage for the people of Ossining.

 

We All Have a Role to Play

Levon on his first trip to our state capital.  He spent the day with his father, working to save mother earth.
Levon on his first trip to our state capital.

Today I am an especially proud wife and mother.

Engaging in our democracy is a core value in our family.  Last night Paxton was recounting the trip he took to Albany with Dada to fight the dragons when he was four.  (Pax and Eric attended a rally to support labor in the wake of Scott Walker’s dismantling of collective bargaining in WI.)  He explained to his little brother, “so now it’s your turn.”  Pax then asked his father, “When is it Mama’s turn to go to Albany?”

He spent the day one-on-one with his father, fighting to save mother earth.
He spent the day one-on-one with his father, fighting to save mother earth.

My turn comes on Sunday.  I’m headed up to our state capital to participate in the New York Conference of Mayors‘ Winter Legislative Meeting.  Tonight I’ll attempt to explain to the boys that there are many ways to honor our democracy.  Whether voting at the ballot box, writing a check, holding a sign, attending a hearing, getting informed, or running for office—in order for our democracy to thrive, we all have a role to play.

Want to learn more about hydrofracking and how you can make a difference?  One organization that’s working hard on this issue is Riverkeeper, based right here in Ossining.  Also, the Working Families party has been out front on this.  And today’s event was organized by Frack Action.

Activists gathered on the "million dollar staircase."
Activists gathered on the “million dollar staircase.”

Music—An Ossining Community Value

There is no greater place for a music lover to live than Ossining.

The richness of music in Ossining is a huge part of what makes this community ideal for raising our family.  Last Sunday we walked down the hill to our public library to attend a free Guy Davis concert.  Paxton and Levon listened, sang and clapped along with their fellow concert-goers.  Afterward, we bought a CD and the boys joked around with Guy as he signed it and dramatically engaged in high-fives with his youngest audience members.

Mike Risko taught me a chord so I’d look like I know what I’m doing for this pic!

There are so many ways to love music—playing, singing, listening, dancing, learning the history…  Growing up I learned a little piano, performed in every school musical and chorus concert, and sang in my college’s gospel choir.  I’m playing the piano more today than I have in decades, as I help Pax and Levon practice.  And Thursday evening I’m going to learn a little guitar at the Rockin’ Moms Night Out.  It’s a fundraiser for the Friends of Victoria Gearity campaign for Ossining Village Trustee, hosted by Risko Music.

Of course, any party is an opportunity to celebrate local Ossining businesses!  We’ll sample treats from Bellina Chocolates and Sterling Sweets, munch savory snacks, and taste selections from Ossining Wine & Liquor (85 Croton Avenue, 914-941-2733) as well as local craft brewers.  Please join us!   The Rockin’ part of the night is thanks to The Mike Risko Music School who is hosting the event and will break out some guitars and provide a mini-lesson to any musically inclined or curious party-goers.

Where else can kids meet and joke with professional musicians on any given Sunday afternoon?

The Mike Risko Music School received a big shout-out at the Guy Davis concert because of the school’s support of the free series.  Alan and Ellen Marzelli are the founders of the Ossining “Words & Music” concert series.  That series is an integral part of what makes Ossining the greatest place I can imagine for raising my family.

This summer Paxton and Levon performed before a live audience for the first time.  They each played a song they learned in their piano classes at Risko.  My boys were the opening act for the Rock Band Campers who composed and performed original pieces in a live outdoor concert at the music school.  How cool is that?!

I lived in OH for six years, so will never take Ossining’s gorgeous sunsets for granted!

So many of us gathered to enjoy warm Friday evenings at the Ossining Waterfront.  There is no more spectacular venue for live music than sitting on a blanket with friends, picnicking, listening, dancing and watching the sunset over the Hudson River at Louis Engel Park.  We have the Ossining Waterfront Vision Committee is to thank for that free public concert series.

When my boys are at Claremont, I look forward to them learning to play violin, viola or cello.  Mike & Miriam Risko demonstrated their profound connection with our community by offering a free Intro to Strings workshop for the new string players before the school year began.

Another terrific live music event is the Ossining MATTERS Benefit Concert.  That’s one ticket I’m happy to pay for.  Last year when audience members were invited to come together in front of the stage, I danced with friends, students, parents, administrators, school board and community members.  It is no wonder that this annual spring fundraiser is such a success in Ossining.

Maybe someday Pax and Levon will form a band—Blue Pizza is the name they’ve already selected.  (If there’s any garage that deserves its own band, it the gorgeous one my husband Eric built!)  Maybe someday my boys will march in the OHS band, or even play Carnegie Hall.  Or maybe they’ll just sing in the shower.  What I do know, is that the rich role music will play throughout their lives is in no small part thanks to the creativity, generosity and dedication of so many wonderful people in Ossining.

Individual contributions are limited to $1,000 and are not tax-deductible.  Please make checks out to Friends of Victoria and mail them to Friends of Victoria Gearity, 57 Prospect Avenue, Ossining, NY  10562.

Event attendees can make donations at the door.  Thanks!!

Supporting Local Businesses with Fun Raising

The Craft Beer Tasting & Pool Party was a big success thanks in large part to the generosity and hard work of our hostess County Legislator Catherine Borgia and several local businesses.  Supporting local businesses is a core value for my family.  It reinforces our goals for preserving our environment, growing our local economy, rewarding ingenuity & customer service, and just old-fashioned looking out for your neighbor.  Some of the local business that directly supported this event were:

The Mike Risko Music School    Sterling Sweets   Charms by Amy  and  The Pastures Grass-Fed Free Range Beef  (at the Ossining Farmers Market)

Bill Hanauer brings such passion to his work as Mayor of Ossining.
Catherine Borgia was such a generous hostess. She’s a fantastic cook and throws a great party. One more terrific reason to become active with the Ossining Democratic Committee!
Life-size lawn signs will be ready in October. Will you post one at your Ossining home? Send me a message below if you can!

David Carlucci made at least four trips across the Tappan Zee on that Saturday. He’s working hard to get to know the Ossining voters he seeks to represent now that his NYS Senate district includes Rockland and Ossining.

I’m not sure what Sandy Galef and I found so hilarious, but I love this picture. She takes her role as public servant seriously, but is joyfully light-hearted about the rest of life.

The Ossining Side of the Hudson

“The 38th District…A River Runs Through It”  That was the phrase suggested by our host Miguel Hernandez at a weekend gathering with NYS Senator David Carlucci.  David Carlucci himself recognized that the senate district line established earlier this year carving Ossining off of Westchester and connecting us with Rockland was ridiculous.  Nonetheless, he has embraced his constituents on our side of the Hudson.

My husband Eric and I enjoyed a lovely evening in the beauty and relative cool of Miguel & Tamsen Hernandez’ yard on Saturday.  This was not our first opportunity to engage with David Carlucci.  I’m aware of several previous occasions when the senator has been in Ossining getting to know us, and our concerns.  Perhaps you shook hands with him at the Ossining Fair, Portuguese Day, or the St. Augustine’s Fair.  He may even have knocked on your door in June when he was gathering signatures for petitions.

The first time I met Senator Carlucci was at a Westchester fundraiser this spring.   When I mentioned my work as a liaison for Energize Ossining, he immediately recognized how the On-Bill Payment legislation he had recently helped pass in Albany, was both confusing to homeowners as well as extremely beneficial to anyone interested in making their home more energy efficient with no out-of-pocket expenses.

The next time you see Senator Carlucci, I encourage you to engage him in a conversation on an issue that matters to you.  He’s likely to be knowledgeable about any NYS legislation related to your concern.  David Carlucci embodies much of what we hope for from an elected official—intelligence, a sincere interest in the concerns and ideas of others, and a dedication to serving the people of his district.

I expect we will be seeing even more of Senator Carlucci and his staff when they open their Ossining office at 80 Spring Street on August 15th.  I appreciate former Mayor Hernandez’ sentiment that the Hudson River flowing through the 38th District may be viewed as a force that unites us.  Surely we do share many of the same concerns as voters on the west side of the Hudson.  And now that we also share a senator, an awareness of Rockland’s interests adds a new element to the glorious sunsets that celebrate the close of each day on the Ossining side of NYS Senate District 38.

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