100 Days

On day 1 of my term as mayor I spoke of big initiatives. There is much to do, and it is reassuring to see all the progress that has been made in just the first 100 days of my term as mayor. Before I list some of the accomplishments of this Board of Trustees, please indulge me as I briefly reflect on what I’ve learned so far. I’ve learned I am a hands-on mayor. I’ve also learned that I can work with anyone in village government because I respect their position and their commitment to serving our community. And while shifting the culture of village government to be more open is not a quick process, everything I do is with a smile because I am so thoroughly enjoying each moment of it.

On April 7 the Board of Trustees announced our decision to hire Abe Zambrano to be the new Village Manager.
On April 7 the Board of Trustees announced our decision to hire Abe Zambrano to be the new Village Manager.

No single decision will have as great an impact on our local government as the selection of Abe Zambrano to be our next Village Manager. The search process was comprehensive and efficient. Abe will be leading an outstanding team of department managers. We on the Village Board of Trustees look forward to Abe’s help in furthering our goals to improve communication, government efficiency and a vibrant economy. We anticipate great success in these efforts as Abe focuses on the day-to-day functioning of the village, and strengthens our relationships with residents, businesses and community organizations.

This Board is committed to improving communication and accessibility. At our first legislative session, this Board of Trustees agreed to keep the cameras rolling throughout the public comment period, reversing a practice of the previous eight years. Thank you to all of the residents who participate in these public meetings.

Open Office Hours with the Mayor are a success. Every Tuesday from 10am to 12noon, I am in the Board of Trustees office, located on the first floor of Village Hall. No appointment is necessary. Occasionally a line forms, but not usually. By meeting with residents in this face-to-face manner, I’ve had the opportunity to hear big picture suggestions as well as address immediate individual concerns.

Improving energy efficiency is another goal of this Board. Last year we identified LED streetlights as a priority. At the March 11 work session we had a lengthy presentation from the group that has installed LED streetlights in other Westchester communities. This initiative allows us to benefit from the work begun by nearby municipalities to reduce our electricity cost for street lights by more than half, and improve the quality of our lighting.

At the March 25 work session we heard from Sustainable Westchester about two significant energy related programs that cost the village only minimal staff resources and no financial commitment. Community Choice Aggregation will immediately provide energy savings for Ossining residents and small business owners, and we are moving forward with the legal process to make that a reality. We are also moving forward with the first stage of positioning Ossining to take advantage of NYPrize funding for a community micro-grid that could provide the Village of Ossining with a reliable energy source even during a widespread blackout.

Proactively making smart development decisions is critical to Ossining’s economic viability and quality of life. On January 28 we hosted a community meeting at the Ossining Public Library to learn about the experience of two other municipalities regarding Green Building Codes. You can read a post about this initiative or watch the video from the meeting where Yonkers and Hastings presented us with their approaches and experiences. If this is a topic that interests you, visit the village website to apply to be on the Green Building Codes committee.

The Ossining Bank for Savings at 200 Main Street is the gateway to our downtown. We have issued a new Request for Proposal, with a bit of a twist this time. We are now open to considering public-private partnerships that could make it a success. The business or organization that breathes life into this historic building will be a powerful force in the revitalization of our Main Street.

MindMixer Ossining is an example of the dedication of this Board to engage the public. We are excited that this new online platform enables us to hear from the community in a quantitative way. It is an easily accessible ongoing series of questions that will focus this year on what Ossining wants to see happen at the heart of our downtown–the Market Square Properties.

Will I see you tomorrow as the JCYS Baseball Season kicks off with their Opening Day Parade? Or perhaps next Saturday, April 18 at Green Ossining’s Earth Day Festival at our waterfront. The theme of this year’s festival is Solar, promoting the Solarize Ossining-Briarcliff program which is a public-private partnership to bring low-cost high-quality solar to our residential and commercial property owners. After this long winter, we could all us a little more sunshine!

Between parades and festivals, I look forward to working with my colleagues in village government on these and so many more initiatives to improve our community and the lives of Ossining residents.

Ways to Get Involved & Informed

Attend a legislative session on the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Meetings are 7:30pm at the Birdsall-Fagan Courthouse, 86-88 Spring Street. There are three opportunities for visitors to speak on camera: Organizational Announcements; Comments on Village Board Resolutions; and Visitor Recognition when you may speak on any subject relevant to the common good of the village.

Serve on a village committee. Currently there are positions available on the Zoning Board of Appeals, the Landlord Tenant Relations Council, the Mid-Hudson Ambulance Committee, and the Green Building Guidelines Committee. Visit the Village of Ossining website for details on how to apply.

Watch BOT meetings on Ch 78 or FIOS 43, or anytime online at the village website or the Village of Ossining YouTube channel.

A couple of media outlets where I’ve shared village news are the Cablevision program Meet the Leaders, and on the second Monday of each month I spend an hour as a guest of Westchester On the Level. I look forward to talking with online radio host Hezi Aris again on Monday, April 13 at 11am.

Beyond Tuesday morning office hours, residents can also reach out via email gearity@villageofossining.org or call 914-941-3554. You can email the entire Board at BOT@villageofossining.org.

 

Vote on Tuesday, Move Ossining Forward

Headshot, fade 2, boost 1, warm, lgtElection Day is Tuesday, November 4, and I am asking for your vote to become the next Mayor of Ossining.  The resounding Democratic primary victory was one big step, but now I need all Village of Ossining voters to make your voices heard so that together we can move our village forward.

I will lead our village government with a bold new vision for economic development and a dedication to face our challenges head-on.  I am a collaborative leader, which is not the most simplistic approach to leadership.  It may seem more expedient for a small group of people to make big decisions, only inviting comment to the degree necessary to check the “public input” box.  But I believe Ossining needs a leader who is dedicated to making smart decisions, informed by the due diligence of officials, as well as valuable contributions of community members.

Before I even announced my candidacy, I created an online survey asking residents for their ideas and opinions about Ossining.  The survey, circulated on social media, through my website and other online media sources, prompted responses from a broad spectrum of community members.  The top three priorities were not surprising:

  1. Downtown Economic Development
  2. Lowering/Slowing Taxes
  3. Illegal Housing

Generating Greater Tax Revenue & Growing a Vibrant Downtown:  While Ossining does have a core group of successful businesses as our foundation, we continue to lag far behind other river towns. And I, for one, have heard enough excuses about why we aren’t seeing the kind of vibrant downtown economies that our neighbors are. Eight years ago, who would have thought that Peekskill, a river community with perceived hurdles greater than ours, could become a mecca for art, live music, and downtown restaurants?  As mayor, I will prioritize generating greater tax revenue and improving our quality of life by growing a vibrant downtown.

As mayor, I would incorporate many of the successful strategies I have learned from visiting other communities who have revitalized their downtowns.  Peekskill hired a downtown development director from the business sector who led an aggressive campaign to partner local businesses with municipal investment and grant funding.  Tarrytown fostered growth on their Main Street as well as their waterfront, and they are now seeking innovative ways to implement Complete Streets best practices to connect these two hubs.  Yonkers established Green Building Guidelines and already they are finding that developers are designing a higher caliber of buildings, which are more desirable to retail and residential tenants.

It is critical that we make the most of our available commercial properties.  Retail businesses have a greater potential for income, and therefore pay a higher tax rate, than office space.  My vision for our downtown is to maximize first floor retail with second floor offices contributing to a daily workforce.  I recently had a conversation with Jessica Irons, a community member who told me, “I have wanted to open up a business downtown since we moved here… Taking my investors on a drive through Ossining a little over a year ago–empty store-fronts, dilapidated buildings–they couldn’t see what I could imagine.”  Last week Jessica reported that it is the excitement of my campaign for mayor that has inspired her and her investors to move forward with opening a theater school.  Her architect is making plans as she negotiates a contract for a space in downtown Ossining.  I look forward to cutting the ribbon at her grand opening!

Tough Budget Decisions, Facing them Head-on:  Listening to my opponent rail against the unfairness of the tax cap, I have to ask the question, “Who in this village thinks the answer to our challenges is raising property taxes?” During last year’s budget process I came to develop an appreciation for the intention of the “2% tax cap” initiative—flawed and misleading as the formula may be.  Having a fixed target of a maximum recommended tax increase commands our attention to each expense we consider.  Here is a post I wrote last year reflecting on our 2014 budget.

The greatest local tax burden we feel is our school taxes.  My efforts as Trustee have already begun to build stronger communication between our planning department and the school district.  We must take advantage of the opportunities for school district concerns to be addressed during the planning process, while exploring more ways to ensure that our school buildings have room for the children of Ossining without overburdening taxpayers.  My outreach to our village planner, planning board, school administration, and board of education opened up a dialogue for a better understanding of how development impacts our school system.  I am currently exploring how developers may be able to help fund future capital projects, like constructing classrooms for our increasing enrollment.  This suggestion could become a reality as the school district considers working with our NYS representatives to permit a special fund to be established allowing proactive collaboration between developers, planners, and the school district.

Solving the Problems of Overcrowded Housing:  For much of the last eight years many in village government have been unwilling to even acknowledge that our overcrowded housing problem is real.  Overcrowded housing creates unsafe conditions for first-responders and residents, and it unfairly taxes law-abiding property owners by creating too much stress on our municipal services and schools.  We need a Mayor with the political courage to find comprehensive solutions by inviting all stakeholders to the table—firefighters and housing advocates, police officers and planners, code enforcers and property owners.

I am proud of this campaign for mayor that I have led.  I am honored to have the support of such a broad and enthusiastic coalition, including elected leaders in our local, county and state government.  Because I realize that no single group of people has a monopoly on great ideas, as Mayor I intend to lead a series of community meetings to help us address our greatest challenges head-on.  Through my work with innovative leaders from across Westchester and the Hudson Valley, I understand how to lead a collaborative process that takes advantage of all the skills, talents and passion of our residents.  With this approach, we will marshal the best ideas from the Ossining community to move us forward.

As mayor, I will improve communication with residents via better use of email and social media.  Here is a post I wrote in the wake of the boil water advisory.  I solicited input from the community and led a work session discussion with village colleagues providing recommendations for improving communication during an emergency.  To promote greater access for in-person conversations, I will hold weekly office hours so that residents can meet with me with no appointment necessary.  And I will work to once again keep the cameras rolling throughout public comments at village board meetings.

My excitement about leading an inclusive village government comes from my ability to listen to differing opinions, and a confidence that Ossining will grow stronger the more that people have constructive opportunities to help our community.  Ossining is ready to move forward.  I hope I can count on your vote on Tuesday, November 4.

Standing Strong

I posted the below message on Facebook yesterday.  The outpouring of support has been remarkable.  Encouraging statements have come from family, friends, supporters, and folks who are simply fed-up with village politics.  This week is certainly not a high point for transparency in local government.  The residents of Ossining deserve better.  I am grateful to be connecting with so many community members, and look forward to building a more open, responsive and engaging relationship between village officials and the public.

Last night it was alleged that ethics charges have been filed against me.  This action serves only to reinforce my dedication to becoming a mayor who reaches out to the community, encouraging transparency and public engagement.

I have not yet seen the “ethics charges” referenced during last night’s publicly televised Board of Trustees meeting.  However, other village employees have.  Trustee Bob Daraio stated that “ethics charges” impacted his vote to support granting preferred developer status for 200 Main Street to Interoceanic Corporation.

No effort was made to obtain my response to this allegation, or even inform me of the charge before publicly revealing it as a pretext to discredit both my husband’s business, Sing Sing Kill Brewery, and myself.  The village struggled to locate the said email and could not even provide me with a copy of it.

Does it seem fair and transparent that a trustee referenced “ethics charges” when casting a vote, while I am the accused and I have not even seen them?  Did all the voting members of the board have access to that same information when they cast their votes?  The vote itself was tainted, and such an important decision on a key property should have been tabled pending resolution of the issue—particularly given that the source of the alleged complaint is Daniel V. Remer, a supporter of my opponent.

This bullying tactic is consistent with the current administration’s practice of stifling public comments.

So proud to have co-founded this group dedicated to engaging the community on issues that matter.  Last night our topic was gun violence.  Our committee is pictured here with our outstanding panelists.
So proud to have co-founded this group dedicated to engaging the community on issues that matter. Last night our topic was gun violence. Our committee is pictured here with our outstanding panelists.  www.OssiningDocumentaries.org

My public statements regarding 200 Main Street were made with complete disclosure that I am a Village Trustee and a Candidate for Mayor, and that I have recused myself from all deliberations and decision-making regarding the village-owned property because my husband is an interested party.  The article I wrote in the Patch provided information and encouraged public engagement about a flagship property whose future will dramatically impact the vibrancy of our downtown economy.  I was heartened by the thoughtful and respectful public response that resulted.

Being an elected official does not mean I give up my first amendment right to free speech as a resident of this great nation.  Is expressing an opinion, while being completely open about my position in the village and in relation to the subject of discussion, unethical?

I have done nothing wrong.  I am troubled by the timing of these allegations.

I am grateful for the outpouring of support I have already received from friends and community members who recognize this tactic for what it is—bullying designed to discredit a candidate who seeks transparency and public engagement.

Governing with Courage

In discussions around the village, I’m finding that some community members misunderstand my position on preserving Ossining’s charter village status.

I have never advocated for dissolving the village, and I do not believe it would be good for Ossining.  Beyond the importance of honoring our rich history, there are powers and autonomy inherent in being a charter village that we would be foolish to give up.  I do, however, believe leaders should explore more opportunities for shared services to reduce redundancy and save tax dollars.

Carolyn Mackie Oss PicAs Albany pushes us to work harder at finding further opportunities for consolidation, village officials must hold the interest of the people of Ossining as our highest priority in all decision making.  Ossining already has over a dozen fiscally wise inter-municipal agreements that do not undermine our autonomy.

It is time for change in Ossining—time to shake up the status quo.

This mayoral race is about electing the person who will best serve our community.  I’ll always strive to work with political courage for the people of Ossining.

 

Campaign Announcement

In March I formally announced my candidacy for Mayor of the Village of Ossining.  April 21, I was honored to earn the endorsement of the Ossining Democratic Committee to be the next Ossining Village Mayor.  Below is my first formal announcement of my intentions.  There’s much more to come!

It is not a step I take lightly.  I do so because I feel strongly that we need to move forward with implementing new ideas and more positive change in Ossining.  I do so with the support of my family and hundreds of community members that havictoria headshot b&wve encouraged me to take this step.

For more than the past year, I have talked to citizens that represent a wide cross-section of Ossining.  As Village Trustee I have listened carefully to what people say about our community and how they perceive the current leadership.

It is clear that many citizens agree it is time for fresh leadership in the Village of Ossining.

It is clear that we need a mayor who invites, encourages and respects opinions from throughout the community.  A mayor who listens to all perspectives and makes sure that the community is part of the conversation.  A mayor who is open to new ideas.

We need strategic planning that contributes to a balanced growth in our economy—one with new businesses and new jobs, as we see happening in other communities.  We need a mayor who honors Ossining’s history with an eye toward a vibrant future for generations to come.  We need a mayor who recognizes the importance of strong collaboration with our schools, neighboring villages and the Town of Ossining.

One of Ossining’s most important resources is our diversity.  We need to develop an environment that will help integrate all of our citizens in the community, including our growing Hispanic community.

As parents of a family with two young children, my husband and I understand the need to live within our budget and expect our government, at every level, to do the same.  I am committed to keeping our taxes in check and reducing the burden on all of us, young and old.

My record of involvement in community affairs, both listening and acting, as well as my reputation as a respectful and respected leader, will present a clear choice for the voters.  In the weeks and months ahead, I will work hard to earn your trust and to make it clear why it is time for change in our village.

Since January I have been asking community members to share their thoughts in an online survey of what we can do better in Ossining, gathering a community-wide aggregation of opinions.  Finding ways to connect with community members is essential to understanding the needs and values of Ossining residents.  If you have not yet had an opportunity to complete the survey, I invite you to now by clicking here.

Today, I appeal to the voters to support my candidacy and ultimately vote for me on November 4, 2014.

To donate to the campaign please click here. Campaign donations are not tax deductible.

Decisions Are Made by Those Who Show Up

I remember on my 18th birthday when the gift I selected to open first was a manila envelope, my mother said, “Well that’s appropriate.”  Inside was a voter registration form.  That’s the day I signed-up as a member of the Democratic Party. I’ve been a consistent voter and avid follower of national politics, but it wasn’t until recent years that I’ve come to understand how democracy works at the grassroots level.  And I’m still learning more all the time.

Wednesday, April 24 I will attend the Westchester County Democratic Committee Convention.  Did you even know that event existed?  It’s a mini version of a national party convention.  The vote I’m most excited to cast is for Noam Bramson.  He’s seeking the Committee’s nomination to challenge Rob Astorino in November to become our new Westchester County Executive.

Here’s a brief video his campaign has put together so you can learn more about him. 


As the mayor of New Rochelle, Noam has demonstrated a talent for collaboration, forward-looking vision, and a powerful work ethic.  He launched and guided a range of initiatives that have had a significant impact on New Rochelle’s government and community.  These include writing New Rochelle’s award-winning GreeNR Sustainability Plan and establishing a Citizens’ Panel on Sustainable Budgets.  Noam has aggressively pursued grant funding that has helped hire new firefighters; provide youth & young adult job training & placement; repair parks damaged by storms; and improve downtown code enforcement.

Noam’s mayoral leadership extends far beyond legislating.  He is an engaged decision-maker who works closely with the city manager and members of the city staff to advance public priorities.  He also serves as the city’s chief advocate for economic development and intergovernmental relations.  In his eight years as mayor, Noam has earned incredible bipartisan support, taking 79% of the vote in the last election.

To this point, Noam’s campaign has been to earn the nomination to be County Executive.  If he wins a majority of votes from District Leaders on Wednesday, you’ll get to learn a lot more about this remarkable man that I so enthusiastically endorse to be our next Westchester County Executive.

It’s an exciting time to be a District Leader.  As you read this, if you are wishing you could be part of the decision-making about what names will be on the ballot next time, I’ll gladly put you in touch with the Ossining Town Democratic Committee leaders so you can learn more about getting involved.  In politics, as in life, decisions are made by those who show up.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: